• Q&A: How do you assess for the risk of dehydration at your facility?

    Tuesday, February 11, 2020 | Juzell (Joey) Pettis, DNS-CT, DWC, WCC
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  • ACIP Immunization Recommendation Change for Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13) for > 65 (2/20)

    Monday, February 10, 2020 | ACIP

    Changes in the 2020 Adult Immunization Schedule

    Changes in the 2020 adult immunization schedule for persons aged ≥19 years include new or revised recommendations for hepatitis A vaccine (HepA) (2); human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV) (3); influenza vaccine (4); serogroup B meningococcal vaccine (MenB); pneumococcal vaccine (5); and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) (6). Following are the changes to the cover page, Table 1, Table 2, and Notes.

    Cover page

    • Trademark symbols (®) were added to all vaccine trade names.
    • PedvaxHIB was added to the table of trade names for Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine.
    • The footnote on the cover page has been edited and now reads “Do not restart or add doses to vaccine series if there are extended intervals between doses.”

    Table 1

    • Age ranges: The columns for age groups 19–21 years and 22–26 years have been combined, thereby reducing the number of columns for age ranges from five to four. This change was made because of the change in recommendation for catch-up HPV vaccination for all adults aged ≤26 years.
    • Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis row: This row has been edited to state that tetanus and diphtheria toxoids (Td) or Tdap may be used for the decennial tetanus booster.
    • Human papillomavirus (HPV) row: The rows for males and females have been combined, reflecting that catch-up vaccination is now recommended for all adults aged ≤26 years. In addition, a blue box has been added for persons aged 27–45 years to indicate that shared clinical decision-making regarding vaccination is now recommended for this group.
    • Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13) row: The box for persons aged ≥65 years who do not have an additional risk factor or another indication has been changed to blue to indicate that shared clinical decision-making regarding vaccination is now recommended for this group.
    • Meningococcal B (MenB) row: A blue box has been added for persons aged 19–23 years who are not at increased risk for meningococcal disease, indicating that shared clinical decision-making regarding vaccination is now recommended for this group.
    • Legend: A blue box has been added to indicate that shared clinical decision-making is recommended regarding vaccination. The text defining the gray box has been edited and now reads “No recommendation/not applicable.”

    Table 2

    • Tdap or Td row: This row has been revised to read that Td or Tdap may be used for the decennial tetanus booster.
    • Human Papillomavirus (HPV) row: This row has been combined into a single row including both males and females, reflecting that HPV vaccine is now recommended for all adults aged ≤26 years.
    • Hepatitis A (HepA) row: The box for persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (regardless of CD4 count) is now yellow, reflecting the new recommendation that previously unvaccinated persons in this group should be vaccinated.
    • Legend and bar text: The gray box in the Legend has been edited and now reads “No recommendation/not applicable.” The red box has been edited and now reads “Not recommended/contraindicated — vaccine should not be administered.” The text appearing in the red bars has been changed from “Contraindicated” to “Not Recommended.”
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  • CMS QSO Memo re: Coronavirus and Healthcare Facility Expectations (2/20)

    Monday, February 10, 2020 | CMS

    Memo #20-09-ALL

    Posting Date 2020-02-06

    Fiscal Year 2020

    Summary

    • Information Regarding Patients with Possible Coronavirus Illness: the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued information on the respiratory illness caused by the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV). Links to these documents are provided.
    • Healthcare Facility Expectations: CMS strongly urges the review of CDC’s guidance and encourages facilities to review their own infection prevention and control policies and practices to prevent the spread of infection.
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  • Nursing Home Infection Control Self-Assesssment Worksheet From CMS and CDC (12/19)

    Monday, December 2, 2019 | CMS

    This 2019 Nursing Home Infection Control Worksheet (ICWS) is a collaborative effort by CMS and CDC and meant to be used by facilities as a self-assessment tool. It comprises both regulatory requirements and best practices in infection prevention and control. A facility that uses this ICWS will identify gaps in practice and have a “roadmap” that can lead to an improved infection prevention and control program. The assessment reviews the following domains:

    • Infection Control program infrastructure and Infection Preventionist
    • Infection Preventionist relationship to Quality Assurance Committee
    • Infection surveillance and outbreak response.
    • Influenza and pneumococcal Immunization
    • Linen management
    • Infection prevention during transitions of care
    • Water Management Program
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  • AHRQ 2019 Chartbook on Patient Safety (10/19)

    Monday, October 28, 2019 | AHRQ

    This Chartbook on Patient Safety includes a section with results from the National Nursing Home Survey on Patient Safety:

    National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report

    This Patient Safety chartbook is part of a family of documents and tools that support the National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report (QDR). The QDR includes annual reports to Congress mandated in the Healthcare Research and Quality Act of 1999 (P.L. 106-129). This chartbook includes a summary of trends across measures of patient safety from the QDR and figures illustrating select measures of patient safety. A PowerPoint version is also available that users can download for presentations.

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  • Oct. 24 CDC Call With Free CE: Preventing the Spread of Novel or Targeted Multidrug-resistant Organisms (MDROs) in Nursing Homes through Enhanced Barrier Precautions

    Wednesday, October 23, 2019 | CDC

    At the conclusion of the session, the participant will be able to accomplish the following:

    • Describe the burden of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs).
    • Describe challenges to preventing MDRO transmission in nursing homes.
    • Define Standard Precautions, Enhanced Barrier Precautions, and Contact Precautions.
    • Identify which residents and activities meet criteria for Enhanced Barrier Precautions.
    • Discuss best practices for implementing Enhanced Barrier Precautions.
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  • Infection Prevention and Control: CDC Prevention Epicenters Program Innovation and Best Practices for PPE Use (10/19)

    Wednesday, October 23, 2019 | CDC

    Unrecognized spread of germs from healthcare personnel (HCP) contamination occurs every day in healthcare settings, posing a risk to patients and HCP alike. Recent Ebola virus outbreaks demonstrated that the potential for transmission of any pathogen in healthcare settings poses an immediate and serious threat. 

     Preventing the spread of germs in healthcare is essential to protecting the health of patients and HCP. This International Infection Prevention Week, the CDC Prevention Epicenters Program is pleased to announce a groundbreaking new journal supplement, “Personal Protective Equipment for Preventing Contact Transmission of Pathogens: Innovations from CDC’s Prevention Epicenters Program,” composed of 14 in-depth studies, published in this month’s Clinical Infectious Diseases. This research provides insights from recent personal protective equipment (PPE) work in U.S. healthcare settings. It provides evidence to improve routine use of PPE, and to prevent contact transmission of Ebola and other infectious diseases in healthcare settings.

    All healthcare settings can benefit from improvements in PPE use and design. PPE plays an important role in preventing the spread of infectious diseases in healthcare settings, but its optimal design and use need to be informed by dedicated research to achieve the reliability and effectiveness needed to protect patients and HCP. 

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  • AHRQ Study: Adverse Events in LTC Residents Transitioning From Hospital Back to NF (8/19)

    Monday, August 12, 2019 | AHRQ

    Transitions from hospitals to long-term care facilities are associated with safety hazards. This prospective cohort study identified adverse events in the 45 days following acute hospitalization among 555 nursing home residents, which included 762 discharges during the study period. Investigators found that adverse events occurred after approximately half of discharges. Common adverse events included falls, pressure ulcers, health care–associated infections, and adverse drug events. Most adverse events were deemed preventable or ameliorable. The authors conclude that improved communication and coordination between discharging hospitals and receiving long term-care facilities are urgently needed to address this patient safety gap. A previous WebM&M commentary discussed challenges of nursing home care that may contribute to adverse events.


    Transitions from hospitals to long-term care facilities are associated with safety hazards. This prospective cohort study identified adverse events in the 45 days following acute hospitalization among 555 nursing home residents, which included 762 discharges during the study period. Investigators found that adverse events occurred after approximately half of discharges. Common adverse events included falls, pressure ulcers, health care–associated infections, and adverse drug events. Most adverse events were deemed preventable or ameliorable. The authors conclude that improved communication and coordination between discharging hospitals and receiving long term-care facilities are urgently needed to address this patient safety gap. A previous WebM&M commentary discussed challenges of nursing home care that may contribute to adverse events.
    Transitions from hospitals to long-term care facilities are associated with safety hazards. This prospective cohort study identified adverse events in the 45 days following acute hospitalization among 555 nursing home residents, which included 762 discharges during the study period. Investigators found that adverse events occurred after approximately half of discharges. Common adverse events included falls, pressure ulcers, health care–associated infections, and adverse drug events. Most adverse events were deemed preventable or ameliorable. The authors conclude that improved communication and coordination between discharging hospitals and receiving long term-care facilities are urgently needed to address this patient safety gap. A previous WebM&M commentary discussed challenges of nursing home care that may contribute to adverse events.

    Transitions from hospitals to long-term care facilities are associated with safety hazards. This prospective cohort study identified adverse events in the 45 days following acute hospitalization among 555 nursing home residents, which included 762 discharges during the study period. Investigators found that adverse events occurred after approximately half of discharges. Common adverse events included falls, pressure ulcers, health care–associated infections, and adverse drug events. Most adverse events were deemed preventable or ameliorable. The authors conclude that improved communication and coordination between discharging hospitals and receiving long term-care facilities are urgently needed to address this patient safety gap. A previous WebM&M commentary discussed challenges of nursing home care that may contribute to adverse events.


    Transitions from hospitals to long-term care facilities are associated with safety hazards. This prospective cohort study identified adverse events in the 45 days following acute hospitalization among 555 nursing home residents, which included 762 discharges during the study period. Investigators found that adverse events occurred after approximately half of discharges. Common adverse events included falls, pressure ulcers, health care–associated infections, and adverse drug events. Most adverse events were deemed preventable or ameliorable. The authors conclude that improved communication and coordination between discharging hospitals and receiving long term-care facilities are urgently needed to address this patient safety gap. A previous WebM&M commentary discussed challenges of nursing home care that may contribute to adverse events.


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  • OIG Audit Finds Staff Didn't Always Comply With Care Plan for Residents With UTI at One NF (6/19)

    Wednesday, June 19, 2019 | OIG

    Princeton Place Did Not Always Comply With Care Plans for Residents Who Were Diagnosed With Urinary Tract Infections (A-06-17-02002)

    Princeton Place did not always provide services to Medicaid-eligible residents diagnosed with UTIs in accordance with their care plans, as required by Federal regulations. Specifically, Princeton Place staff did not always document that they monitored the residents' urine appearance at the frequencies specified in their care plans. Princeton Place did not have policies and procedures to ensure that its staff provided services in accordance with its residents' care plans. As a result of Princeton Place not following residents' care plans, the residents were at increased risk for contracting UTIs and for incurring complications from UTIs, including requiring hospitalization.

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  • Abuse and Neglect of Medicare Beneficiaries: OIG Targets SNFs (6/19)

    Wednesday, June 12, 2019 | OIG

    The Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General issued two new reports that address the identification, reporting and investigation of incidents of potential abuse and neglect of our nation's most vulnerable populations, including seniors and individuals with developmental disabilities. OIG issued an early alert in 2017 based on the preliminary findings of this work. Our resulting work, released in June 2019, identify thousands of Medicare claims that indicate abuse and neglect of beneficiaries, including beneficiaries in skilled nursing facilities. If you suspect someone is the victim of abuse or neglect, contact law enforcement immediately.

    Reports:

    CMS Could Use Medicare Data To Identify Instances of Potential Abuse or Neglect 

    Incidents of Potential Abuse and Neglect at Skilled Nursing Facilities Were Not Always Reported and Investigated

     

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