Volunteer with AADNS

You’re a leader in your facility, and now you can be a leader in your profession. Make the commitment to volunteer with AADNS. From writing opportunities to serving on a formal committee, put your knowledge and passion for long-term care to good use!

At AADNS, you can volunteer in a capacity that’s right for you.

Write articles and other content for AADNS members to learn from. As a subject-matter expert in the field of long-term care, your passion and knowledge can be transcribed into educational readings for other members. Let us know your area of expertise and we’ll match you with a related topic.

Answer questions and assist others in the DNS Network community. Not everyone has been doing this forever. In fact, a new DNS is starting their first day on the job today. How did you feel and what questions did you have? What questions do you still have several years into the job? Take time to share advice with those who need it most.

Serve on an expert panel or committee. Commit to being part of a devoted group of leaders that help to shape and improve the content delivered through AADNS. Positions for these committees are on an as-needed basis, but we’d love to know your interest should an opening become available.

Become an advocate for long-term care issues. You’ve likely been an advocate for quite some time; advocating for residents and that the care provided is what you’d want for yourself one day. But what about issues that could affect you and the post-acute care profession down the road? Take a stand by using your voice to create change.

Serve as a mentor for other members. Share your experience and expertise with nurse leaders new to the profession or who are looking for further growth. Add your input in helping peers as they take on challenges such as time management, resident-directed care, and work-life balance.

DNS-Expert Advisory Panel

Special thanks to the DNS-Expert Advisory Panel. This group of highly-skilled individuals ensures AADNS's leadership materials are routinely reviewed to reflect current thinking in nursing practice and government regulation.

  • Shelly Acus
  • Sandy Biggi 
  • Barbara BatesChair
  • Jeanne Gerstenkorn
  • Betsy Hardy
  • Lynn Milligan
  • Ruth Minnema
  • Linda Shell
  • Linda Winston- Co-Chair